CAUTION: Vitamin B12 Sublinguals — The Citric Acid Additive Can Erode Tooth Enamel

dannybex

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I also would prefer an b12 with no sweetners or anything. The Anabol Dibencoplex is an excellent AdoCbl (adenosylcobalamin) and it has no sweetner or flavoring. I open the capsule and use 1/3 to 1/4 cap at a tome along my gum and lower lip and it sits there absorbing for 2-3 hours., Works great. Right now I am using 30 Enzymatic mb12 tablets a day to get enough high quality mb12 into my BRAIN ehlping heal the problems. Also, no irritation. It is non-acid and doesn't erode enamal. The sweetners I can't do anything about. B12 has no taste that has to be masked.
I agree -- I wish they would stop using -- or that some company -- maybe the company that makes Anabol -- would make a methylb12 without these unnecessary sweeteners. At least the Enzymatic product doesn't have any citric acid -- that may have been the ingredient that was causing tooth and gum issues. The fructose in the Enzymatic b12 could cause a problem for teeth, but that probably depends to on one's overall dental situation. Personally, I rinse with water and a little baking soda after the tablet has dissolved.
 

arx

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Actually the hypothesis about mb12 causing the problems was wrong in the first place. You appear to now be having tissue breakdown that likely will continue to break down without the mb12. Good luck.
Hi Fred,

I'm sorry but I should have been more specific. The mb12 sublinguals contained citric acid, which I think was causing the entire sensitivity and soreness when I started with the protocol. I have gum inflammation and itching now. I'm using a gum astringent and a remineralization toothpaste.

How is you health these days?
 

Lotus97

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Would Tri-Salts work for a remineralizing toothpaste? It has Calcium Carbonate, Magnesium Carbonate, and Potassium Bicarbonate. I'm not sure if that's the cheapest solution for others, but I already have some so it's free for me :)
 

adreno

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The citric acid in the Jarrow B12 also blasted my gums. Switched to Solgar, and problem gone.
 

Lotus97

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If a sublingual doesn't have citric acid listed as an ingredient, but it does say "natural orange flavor" could it still have that?
 

Lotus97

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And the adb12 -- Dibencozide -- from Source Naturals -- doesn't have any citric acid in it. Also, Prohealth makes a hb12 that doesn't have citric acid.
dbkita was saying that Source Naturals Dibencozide caused problems even though it doesn't have citric acid (although it does list natural flavors as an ingredient). However, as other people mentioned part of the problem might be due to keeping it between the upper gum and lip as this person was doing rather than holding the sublingual under the tongue (as god intended it). I would like to know what's going on because I've recently been taking Perque's Hydroxocobalamin between my upper gum and lip. I've been too afraid to try any of Source Naturals' sublinguals there though, but I haven't had any problems using theirs under my tongue even though both the ones I use seem to have a sour flavor (haven't tried their 10mg dibencozide, but I'm not sure if it's the b12 itself or the fillers that cause people problems).
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/anabol-dibencoplex-vs-source-natural-adb12.21575/
I have been experiencing some benefits now using 1/4 tablet of the Source Naturals per day.
However, placing it under the upper lip seems to be damaging / stripping enamel from the upper
teeth at the gumline. I have heard some people like the Anabol brand but other complain the powder does not dissolve well when placed along the lower gums.
 

Lotus97

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I had heard that using plain baking soda (not baking soda toothpaste) was abrasive, but according to this it seems it scores very low on abrasiveness measures. Interestingly, some of the "sensitive" toothpastes scored moderate rather than low on abrasiveness. I'm not sure if this matters, but it seems the source of these scores are the companies that manufacture the toothpastes. The source of blain baking soda's score was by the company that makes Arm and Hammer baking soda toothpaste.
http://www.satyen.com/toothpastes.shtml
I wonder if there is a difference of abrasiveness of baking soda depending on whether you mix it with water when brushing your teeth. I'm not sure why some people are saying it's abrasive.
 

Lotus97

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Thorne has methylcobalamin in capsule form so that could be taken sublingually by putting it between the lip and gum. Someone was also saying you could make your own sublingual tablet by using a tube and a rod and hammer. I don't remember where the thread is though.
 
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The sublingual B12 liquid I use doesn`t have citric acid as an ingredient but it makes my teeth go crazy.. I think I know what causes it because I get exactly the same thing from eating pure raw honey, The B12 brand I use is made from
Purified Water, Glycerine (vegetable), Cyanocobalamin, Potassium Sorbate.

Glycerine is made from sugar so I think it`s got something to do with the sugar & which would explain why the honey causes a similar feeling.
 

Hip

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What does "makes my teeth go crazy" mean?

Note that the cyanocobalamin form of B12 is not generally recommended in ME/CFS.
 
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What I've started doing if it's hurting my teeth is lying on my stomach or sitting with my head leaned forward while they are absorbing. That way it runs onto my lip instead of my teeth. Still possible to use a laptop or tablet that way.
 
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It kind of hurts a bit like a toothache for a few minutes and then goes away, honey does the same thing, it`s like it gets inside and gets to the nerves or something. My teeth are in ok shape with nothing serious going on. After learning more about the cyanocobalamin B12 I`ve decided to not get that type anymore and get the Methylcobalamin from now on. Is it just not as good or is there something bad about the cyanocobalamin?
 

taniaaust1

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After learning more about the cyanocobalamin B12 I`ve decided to not get that type anymore and get the Methylcobalamin from now on. Is it just not as good or is there something bad about the cyanocobalamin?
Cyanocobalamin contains cyanide as most of us have trouble with toxins and many of us take high doses, it just isnt a probably good thing to be taking http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanocobalamin .
. Cyanocobalamin is the form in most pharmaceutical preparations because adding cyanide stabilizes the molecule.[1]
It also needs to be converted by the body to become an active form of B12 and many of us dont convert well and need an active form.

................

I have lost most of my enemal due to sports drinks a doctor had me on at one point for the POTS. I havent thou noticed any issues with taking my methyl B12 under my tongue for nearly a year now. I take the high potency Natural Factors brand (which does contain lactose and another thing I dont know what it is, along with cellose and a type of magnesium).
 
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I think it`s just gum sensitivity or something but I`ll try the Methylcobalamin and see if it does the same thing, I think it`s the glycerine causing the pain though and not the actual type of B12. I can take it and try not to get it near my teeth and that`s ok but it would be good to know what causes it and why. I guess eating pure honey or glycerine is not such a good idea for teeth or for glucose levels either.
 

Critterina

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I had a really nice talk with my dentist and he is going to give an answer. He didn't know off the top of his head. But we were agreed that tooth enamel does not have any nerve endings, so you aren't going to feel it if the enamel is being dissolved, until it's gone and the exposed nerves in the dentin start reacting.
 

CFS_for_19_years

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I could swear I had one of the types of B12 (methylB12 or AdB12) erode the tooth enamel on an upper front tooth. It was painful and I had to wait for my dental insurance to kick in to take care of it.

Now if I'm going to let the B12 slowly dissolve I tuck it into my LOWER gums, that way it doesn't fall by gravity into the gumline. It still can get into the lower gums so I try to rinse it away when about 30 minutes have passed.

The B12 molecule is too big to be absorbed sublingually, so all this is doing is trickling it slowly into the stomach where it's eventually absorbed anyway.
 

Hip

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I had a really nice talk with my dentist and he is going to give an answer. He didn't know off the top of his head. But we were agreed that tooth enamel does not have any nerve endings, so you aren't going to feel it if the enamel is being dissolved, until it's gone and the exposed nerves in the dentin start reacting.
The nerves in teeth are sensitive to heat, so even if the enamel is just thinned by acid erosion, this will reduce thermal insulation of the enamel and allow more heat from hot food or drinks through to the nerves in the dentin. So you may well experience tooth sensitivity to heat even when the enamel is just thinned.

Note also that acid erosion is not uniform: it creates pits and holes in the emamel. So again, even if not all of the enamel is eroded away, you may have tiny pits and holes that allow access to the nerves in the dentin below the enamel. So again you may experience tooth sensitivity even when the enamel is just thinned.


What Causes Sensitive Teeth?

Toothbrush and/or toothpaste damage may be the most frequent cause of sensitive teeth. By brushing too hard and/or using abrasive toothpaste, you may be removing tooth structure at the necks of your teeth.

Other things which can cause sensitive teeth include:

acid erosion,
gum recession,
gum disease,
tooth grinding,
tooth bleaching, and
a cracked tooth or filling.

This can result in pain, especially to cold drinks, food, and air, but also to physical pressure, hot, sweet and sour.

The reason for the pain is exposed dentine – the inner substance of the tooth, which is covered by enamel. The enamel can get quite thin, especially where the tooth meets the root (at the gumline). The root is covered by a substance called cementum, which is easily worn away. Dentine contains little tunnels (tubules) that link to the nerves on the inside of the tooth, and when dentine is exposed, these nerves are easily stimulated, resulting in pain.

Source: here.