Started Ubiqinol (Q10) Interested in how it worked or not for others

Wolfcub

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I started taking Ubiquinol (Co-enzyme Q10) today, and am interested in if others have tried it and any results?

The recommended dosage is 1-2 tablets per day. I started with one which I took midday after eating.

I'm generally not doing too badly, but do get periods when some of the "old symptoms" return, though never as bad as they were 10-11 months ago.
That mainly is a general feeling of "coming down with flu" but which never develops into anything, just hangs around for a few days then lifts again.
Plus my general energy levels are only about 70% what they were prior to becoming unwell last Spring.
I am not complaining. I can live pretty well, and any exhaustion is mostly manageable. Compared to many others I am doing okay. But would like (obviously) to feel better

It seems like a good idea to try Q10. I have never taken it before.

I would very much like to hear anyone's experiences?
 

Pyrrhus

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Many people have tried coQ10. If you search for other threads on coQ10, you should find other people's experiences.

In general, it seems to give noticeable energy at first, but can interfere with sleep. The question is whether the sleep interference leads to a more tired state in the long run. Try it and see!
 

Wishful

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It didn't do anything for me, even at double the recommended dosage. I seem to recall someone else saying it works for them, but at much, much higher dosage. I declined to experiment with such high dosages.
 

Moof

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This was bought for me – at some expense, I think – by a friend a few years ago. I tried it, tweaked the dosage around, read what others had written, but I never saw any difference. I finished the tub and haven't taken it since.

To be honest, none of the half dozen or so supplements I've tried have made any difference (except B12, in which I was deficient). I wasn't seriously expecting them to help much, given that I have a reasonable diet, but we all have times when we're stuck and feel we should be trying something!
 

Learner1

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It is not possible to get adequate nutrients just from diet, no matter how high quality it is. It takes over 8,000 calories a day to get 100% of the DV of each nutrient.
 

prioris

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>That mainly is a general feeling of "coming down with flu"
Take some wellmune beta glucan ... should solve that problem quickly
 

Wishful

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It is not possible to get adequate nutrients just from diet, no matter how high quality it is. It takes over 8,000 calories a day to get 100% of the DV of each nutrient.
Obviously we evolved to survive a wide variety of diets. There are various regions where people had a very limited variety: seal meat, blood milk and meat, coconuts and fish. They all seemed to survive quite well. Maybe the recommended daily value is misleading (pressured by the supplement industry).
 
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pogoman

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Coq10 will help someone with mitochondrial issues but its only one part of the different processes of energy production.
I found out that coq10, B2 and carnitine are necessary for me to reduce the muscle pain and neuropathy I've had for years.
Basically they're the core ingredients of the "mito cocktail" used in metabolic disease treatment.
 

Learner1

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Obviously we evolved to survive a wide variety of diets. There are various regions where people had a very limited variety: seal meat, blood milk and meat, coconuts and fish. They all seemed to survive quite well. Maybe the recommended daily value is misleading (pressured by the supplement industry).
We are sick, many of us with crappy genes and guts, which can dramatically increase nutrient needs.

I've done enough testing at different labs to know that I have a number of deficiencies, even though I eat a high quality nutrient dense diet. And, the metabolomics researchers have confirmed biochemistry of ME/CFS patients is lacking in certain biochemicals.

So, this is not at all about any company's or industry's political or business agenda.
 
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Learner1

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Coq10 will help someone with mitochondrial issues but its only one part of the different processes of energy production.
I found out that coq10, B2 and carnitine are necessary for me to reduce the muscle pain and neuropathy I've had for years.
Basically they're the core ingredients of the "mito cocktail" used in metabolic disease treatment.
Yes, and depending on one's genes and environmental factors, there are other mito nutrients that can help, too (or not), like NMN, NAD+, NR, asparagine, manganese, copper, iron, d-ribose, phospholipids, BCAAs, ALA, and glutathione.
 

Stretched

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...
To be honest, none of the half dozen or so supplements I've tried have made any difference (except B12, in which I was deficient). I wasn't seriously expecting them to help much, given that I have a reasonable diet, but we all have times when we're stuck and feel we should be trying something!
I have rotated over 50 supplements over 20+ years. While I believe some have helped with various issues the one I definitely know worked, because I felt its effects are the Omega 3 fish oils. I’m down to 4 grams daily, from 10G and the O3 took away gut and lower intestine pain.

As for the others I’ve not tried an elimination protocol to test their efficacy. I just studied their intended targets and take supplemental doses vs therapeutic amounts - probably wasting money=&
 

prioris

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I have rotated over 50 supplements over 20+ years. While I believe some have helped with various issues the one I definitely know worked, because I felt its effects are the Omega 3 fish oils. I’m down to 4 grams daily, from 10G and the O3 took away gut and lower intestine pain.

As for the others I’ve not tried an elimination protocol to test their efficacy. I just studied their intended targets and take supplemental doses vs therapeutic amounts - probably wasting money=&
prime active ingredient in fish oil is DHA
 

pogoman

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Yes, and depending on one's genes and environmental factors, there are other mito nutrients that can help, too (or not), like NMN, NAD+, NR, asparagine, manganese, copper, iron, d-ribose, phospholipids, BCAAs, ALA, and glutathione.
Agreed, like many here I've tried many different supplements over the years and discarded ones that didn't help or stopped helping.
Spent a bunch of money at it too :D
 

Wolfcub

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I haven't had time to come back to this thread before now but thanks for all the replies.
So far I've taken that low dose Q-10 for 5 days. I haven't upped the dose, just kept it at one a day (no real idea what I'm doing beyond experimenting....lol)
I haven't been feeling so bad generally recently, except for a couple of relapses lasting 3-4 days each time. So it's hard to discern what's different and what's not.

I have sensed my energy & stamina as being approx. 70% of what it was prior to last March.
I have not yet noticed that percentage rise in the last few days at any rate. About the same. But we will see.

The only thing I've noticed the last 3 nights is I have started waking up 2 or 3 times in the middle of the night. Going back to sleep again, but fragmented sleep, which I didn't have before. Even when I felt rotten all the time I was getting straight-through sleep. The waking up thing doesn't feel right (like good energy ready to get up). It feels tense somehow.

I always take the Q-10 about midday with food. Never in the evening.

Well....that waking up could have been caused by bright moonlight, or cars going by early a.m. or my earplugs falling out. Maybe not the Q-10. I'll carry on taking it and see.
 

Wishful

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The issue of required nutrient levels had me wondering how those levels are determined. A quick check found 'How-the-RDA-for-Vitamin-D-Was-Determined'. That gives me the impression that a committee came up with a single value based on a lot of vague assumptions. In fact: 'Because of limitations in the available data, the IOM committee made the judgment to overestimate the dose of dietary vitamin D needed;'

Also: 'The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), by definition, meets the requirements of 97.5 percent of the population. It is set from an Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) that represents an intake amount that will meet the needs of about 50 percent of the population.' Those needs are based on assumptions of what serum levels are optimum.

I think it would be very difficult to measure optimum levels of nutrients for people. It would vary with so many factors, such as body type, genetics, previous diet, and activity level. Does one value work for Eskimos, Pacific islanders, and typical downtown New Yorker's? Furthermore, human bodies are adaptive systems: our absorption, usage and recycling of nutrients changes with a large number of factors, such as present level of that nutrient and others, foods eaten that day, and maybe the music you listen to.

I imagine the committee coming up with a very broad range of valeues for RDAs, and then deciding that a broad range would reduce consumer's confidence in the recommendation (ie. scientists don't really understand what our bodies need), so they reduced it to a single value, to make people happy with false confidence.

I wouldn't put too much emphasis on exactly meeting the RDAs. Our bodies seem to handle large variations without significant issues. My ME-mandated diet is lacking in some nutrients, so I do occasionally take some supplements, admittedly in a very non-scientific manner. Other supplements I'll take if I discover they actually make a significant difference. I think the best approach would be for each of us to experiment with supplemental nutrients, taking them and not taking them, while holding other factors as constant as possible, and repeating until we're confident that the amount of each supplement makes a difference. Doing it double-blind would be even better.

I just don't worry about it much.